The world around us longs for community, and the false sense of connectedness created by Twitter and Facebook won't fill the void. We need robust, life-on-life, in-the-trenches community. God didn't merely "text us," after all. He came. He walked with us, wept with us, rejoiced with us, and loved us in spite of ourselves. If we're embodying this self-giving posture in our churches, then, it'll draw the lonely world to us like a magnet. If this isn't the reality you experience at church, though, you're not alone.

The local church is messy. We've all experienced hurt and disappointment in it. And the head of the church understands, for he knows better than anyone the costliness of living in community. He entered this messy and broken world, and it killed him.

For us to embrace real community will entail crucifixion, too. It'll mean dying to our desires, our preferences, our expectations. But on the other side of crucifixion, there's resurrection. We die to self now in order to enjoy true life forever (Matt. 16:25).

So let's radically love the brother in Sunday school who drives us crazy. Let's invite into our homes the awkward sister no one else approaches. Let's walk into the sanctuary seeking to engage the visitor in conversation. Let's go beyond sports and weather and politics to discuss how the gospel intersects with our lives, our marriages, our families. The more this interaction happens in our churches, the more we will be drawn into the lavish love of the triune God.--David Lookabill

 


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